Temperature

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For the most commonly hatched bird eggs (chicken, duck, quail, goose, pheasant, etc), the commonly accepted ideal temperature is 99.5F. Even so, some people have their own preferences and will adjust this up or down just a little based on their own experience. The results of having your temperature too high or too low will be seen in your hatching experience. If the temperature is too high, but not too high to kill the embryo, your eggs may hatch sooner than the normal hatch time. You may think this is a good thing, but in fact it is not. This goes against what nature has prescribed and often results in weak birds that get sick and die easily or in birth defects, such as deformed feet or heads.
If the temperature is too low, but not low enough to kill the embryo, the eggs may hatch later than the normal time. This often results in too much moisture loss so they have a difficult time getting out of their shell. It also can have the same affect as having the temperature too high; weak birds that are more prone to disease and death.
Setting the correct temperature in your incubator is the single most important thing you can do to get a good hatch. However, it is not as simple as it may seem. As you plug in and turn on your incubator and wait for the temperature to stabilize, it is important to understand a few simple things about thermal dynamics (that is just a fancy way of saying how temperature changes).
The more eggs you have in your incubator, the longer it will take to come up to temperature and stabilize. As the temperature gets close to the set point (the temperature your thermostat is set to), the rate the temperature changes will slow down. You will find that the incubator will start heating up very quickly at first, but the last little bit can take several hours. This is perfectly normal. It is just how the physics work.
This means that as you wait for the temperature to stabilize, you really do have to be patient and wait awhile (just like your incubator instructions say). And it also means that every time you adjust the control (change the set point), you have to again be patient and wait for the temperature to stabilize. Keep in mind, the more eggs you have in your incubator, the longer it will take to come up to the set point and stabilize.


Temperature

For the most commonly hatched bird eggs (chicken, duck, quail, goose, pheasant, etc), the commonly accepted ideal temperature is 99.5F. Even so, some people have their own preferences and will adjust this up or down just a little based on their own experience. The results of having your temperature too high or too low will be seen in your hatching experience. If the temperature is too high, but not too high to kill the embryo, your eggs may hatch sooner than the normal hatch time. You may think ...

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